Category Archives: Drivetrain

Oil Change Tools for the Volkswagen BPG, BPY, BWT and other FSI engines

Volkswagen have a Spezialwerkzeug (Special Tool) for draining oil from the oil filter housing for the following models with FSI engines.

The Volkswagen oil filter housing drain tool is part number T40057 and suits 2006-2008 VW/Audi models with the 2.0L Turbo (engine codes; BPG, BPY, BWT), the 2005.5 – 2011 2.5L inline 5 cyl VW engine and the 2012 onwards VW Golf R.

Engine Codes

BPG, BPY and BWT
CCTA
CBFA
CAEB
CALA
CBRA
CETA
CBPA
CDLC, CDLF, CDLG and CRZA (Golf R 2012 onwards)

Genuine Tools

Assenmacher VW & Audi Oil Filter Drain Tool T40057

volkswagen_oil_change_tool_assenmacher_t40057_2 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_assenmacher_t40057_1

Amazon US ship this wordwide here.

Also the Matra T40057

Aftermarket Tools

Motivx Tools VW & Audi Oil Filter Drain Tool MX2340

volkswagen_oil_change_tool_motivx_1 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_motivx_3 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_motivx_2 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_motivx_5 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_motivx_4

Amazon US ship this worldwide here.

 

MobileFaction VW & Audi Oil Filter Drain Tool

volkswagen_oil_change_tool_mobilefaction_1 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_mobilefaction_2 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_mobilefaction_3

Made in the USA from cast resin.

MobileFaction ship this worldwide here.

Schwaben VW & Audi Oil Filter Drain Tool 000930SCH01A

volkswagen_oil_change_tool_schwaben_1 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_schwaben_2 volkswagen_oil_change_tool_schwaben_3

ECS Tuning ship this worldwide here.

Volkswagen Golf Mark V & VI GTI, R32 and Bluemotion Wheel Alignment Specifications

Suits PR numbers: 2UA, 2UC, G02, G05, G07, 2UC, 2UB, G08, G11, G09, G04/2UC

These specifications apply to all engines.

The ride heights shown in the table refer to
dimension -a-.
Standard running gearSports running gear except 18"Sports running gear with 18" wheelsHeavy-duty running gearSports running gear GTISports running gear GTI US versionSports running gear R32BlueMotion
PR numbers2UA2UCG02, G05, G07, 2UC2UBG08G11G09G04/2UC
Front axle
Total toe (without load)10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'10' +/- 10'
Camber (in straight-ahead
position)
-30' +/- 30'-41' +/- 30'-41' +/- 30'-14' +/- 30'-44' +/- 30'-30' +/- 30'-43' +/- 30'-41' +/- 30'
Maximum permissible
difference between sides
max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'
Toe-out on turns 1) at 20° left
and right lock
1°38' +/- 20'1°40' +/- 20'1°40' +/- 20'1°38' +/- 20'1°22' +/- 20'1°38' +/- 20'1°20' +/- 20'1°40' +/- 20'
Caster7° 34' +/- 30'7° 47' +/- 30'7° 47' +/- 30'7° 17' +/- 30'7° 47' +/- 30'7° 34' +/- 30'7° 47' +/- 30'7° 47' +/- 30'
Maximum permissible
difference between sides
max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'
Ride height382 +/- 10 mm367 +/- 10 mm367 +/- 10 mm402 +/- 10 mm360 +/- 10 mm382 +/- 10 mm362 +/- 10 mm367 +/- 10 mm
Rear Axle
Camber-1° 20' +/- 30'-1° 20' +/- 30'-1° 45' +/- 30'-1° 20' +/- 30'-1° 45' +/- 30'-1° 20' +/- 30'-1° 45' +/- 30'-1° 20' +/- 30'
Maximum permissible
difference between sides
max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'max. 30'
Total toe (At specified camber)+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'+10' +/- 12,5'
Maximum permissible deviation from direction of travelmax. 20'max. 20'max. 20'max. 20'max. 20'max. 20'max. 20'max. 20'
Ride height380 +/- 10 mm365 +/- 10 mm365 +/- 10 mm400 +/- 10 mm365 +/- 10 mm380 +/- 10 mm360 +/- 10 mm365 +/- 10 mm

1) Toe-out on turns can be displayed as a negative value on the wheel alignment computer, depending on the manufacturer.

Mark VI specifications differ with +/- 7mm for ride height

 

 

 

Recommended tyres for the Volkswagen Golf Mark VI

Recommended Summer tyres for

  • Volkswagen Golf from model year 2009
  • Volkswagen Golf GTD from model year 2009
  • Volkswagen Golf GTI from model year 2009
  • Volkswagen Golf R from model year 2009

Tyres are one of the most important elements in motor vehicle construction and have a major influence on road safety. Therefore, they must fulfil numerous conditions which are specified for tyre manufacturers in the DIN (German industrial standards) and the directives of the German rubber industry e. V. (W.d.K.). In addition, comprehensive testing is carried out at Volkswagen before tyres are approved for initial fitting on their vehicles.

The following lists all tyre makes and tread patterns that are fitted to VW vehicles ex-factory, correct at the time of publication (1st Quarter 2010).

These tyre makes/tread patterns meet the aforementioned demands. Volkswagen therefore recommend the tyres/tread types listed in this guide are chosen as replacements.

Volkswagen Golf from model year 2009

195/65 R 15 91T
Goodyear DuraGrip
Goodyear GT 3
Michelin Energy Saver
Michelin Energy 3
Hankook K406
Continental Eco Contact 3

195/65 R 15 91H
Continental Eco Contact 3
Michelin Energy Saver
Michelin Energy 3
Goodyear NCT -5
Goodyear Excellence
Hankook K406
Pirelli P6000
Bridgestone B390
Bridgestone ER 300

195/65 R 15 95H
Michelin Energy 3
Bridgestone B390

195/65 R 15 91V
Pirelli P 6000
Goodyear NCT 5
Michelin Energy 3
Michelin Energy Saver
Bridgestone B390
Bridgestone ER 300
Continental Premium Contact

205/55 R 16 91H
Continental Premium Contact 2
Michelin Energy Saver
Goodyear Excellence

205/55 R 16 91V
Pirelli P 7
Michelin Energy Saver
Michelin Energy 3
Bridgestone ER 30
Bridgestone ER 300
Hankook K105
Goodyear NCT 5
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop Sport 01A

205/55 R 16 91W
Pirelli P 7
Goodyear NCT 5
Bridgestone ER 30
Bridgestone ER 300

205/55 R 16 94V
Goodyear NCT 5
Bridgestone ER 30
Bridgestone ER 300
Michelin Energy 3A

225/45 R 17 91W
Michelin Premacy
Bridgestone RE 40
Bridgestone RE 50
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop SP Sport 01A
Pirelli P Zero Rosso

225/45 R 17 94W
Michelin Premacy

225/45 ZR 17 94W
Michelin P Zero Rosso

225/40 R 18 92Y
Bridgestone RE 050A
Michelin Exalto 2
Dunlop SportMaxx
Continental Sport Contact 2
Michelin P Zero Rosso

Volkswagen Golf GTD from model year 2009

205/55 R 16 91V
Pirelli P 7
Michelin Energy Saver
Michelin Energy 3
Bridgestone ER 30
Bridgestone ER 300
Hankook K105
Goodyear NCT 5
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop Sport 01A

225/45 R 17 91W
Michelin Premacy
Bridgestone RE 40
Bridgestone RE 50
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop SP Sport 01A
Pirelli P Zero Rosso

225/45 R 17 94W
Michelin Premacy

225/45 ZR 17 94W
Michelin P Zero Rosso

225/40 R 18 92Y
Bridgestone RE 050A
Michelin Exalto 2
Dunlop SportMaxx
Continental Sport Contact 2
Michelin P Zero Rosso

Volkswagen Golf GTI from model year 2009

205/55 R 16 91V Pirelli P 7
Michelin Energy Saver
Michelin Energy 3
Bridgestone ER 30
Bridgestone ER 300
Hankook K105
Goodyear NCT 5
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop Sport 01A

225/45 R 17 91W
Michelin Premacy
Bridgestone RE 40
Bridgestone RE 50
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop SP Sport 01A
Pirelli P Zero Rosso

225/45 R 17 94W
Michelin Premacy

225/45 ZR 17 94W
Michelin P Zero Rosso

225/40 R 18 92Y
Bridgestone RE 050A
Michelin Exalto 2
Dunlop SportMaxx
Continental Sport Contact 2
Michelin P Zero Rosso

Volkswagen Golf R from model year 2010

225/45 R 17 91W
Michelin Premacy
Bridgestone RE 40
Bridgestone RE 50
Continental Sport Contact 2
Dunlop SP Sport 01A
Pirelli P Zero Rosso

225/45 R 17 94W
Michelin Premacy

225/45 ZR 17 94W
Michelin P Zero Rosso

225/40 R 18 92Y
Bridgestone RE 050A
Michelin Exalto 2
Dunlop SportMaxx
Continental Sport Contact 2
Michelin P Zero Rosso

235/35 R 19 91Y
Pirelli P Zero
Dunlop SportMaxx
Continental Sport Contact 2

Volkswagen DCC Adaptive Chassis Control – Technical

Failures

A shock absorber fails?

  • If there is a short-circuit or interruption of an adjustment valve, the system immediately switches to “Fail Safe”.
  • The shock absorber symbol in the button flashes to indicate the fault.
  • The vehicle behaves like a vehicle with conventional damping.
The sensors fail?
  • If only one sensor fails, a substitute signal is calculated from the other working sensors. The system is still capable of functioning.
  • If two or more sensors fail, the system will be switched off in stages. The shock absorber symbol on the button flashes at a rate of 1 Hz for 100 milliseconds.
The electronically controlled damping control unit J250 fails?
  • The control unit J250 needs to be reprogrammed via SVM (Service Versions Management).
A shock absorber is replaced and adjustment is required?
  • A basic set-up needs to be carried out (teaching the wheel travel sensors at the lower limit).
The steering fails?
  • The DCC adaptive chassis control still continues to operate.

Special Features

End position damping:

The end position damping is used to avoid end position forces and end position noises in the extension and compression cycle.
Load recognition:

The load recognition is used to determine the body mass of the vehicle as an input variable. This is calculated by evaluating the vehicle level sender and is supplied to other systems on the CAN data bus.

Brake test stand:

The system obtains the wheel speed information on the brake test stand. The body acceleration cannot be calculated however.

Therefore the system always regulates in the range comfort = soft and thus assumes the road conditions are good.

Shock absorber test stand:

On a shock absorber test stand, the system receives information neither from the vehicle level senders, the body acceleration sensors nor wheel speed information.

Therefore the adaptive chassis control presumes the vehicle is stationary. The shock absorbers are not powered and can therefore be checked normally.

Volkswagen DCC Adaptive Chassis Control – Design and Function

DCC Adaptive Chassis Control

The rule for suspension systems has always been that increasing sportiness compromises the ride. In this new system – the DCC adaptive chassis control, the suspension constantly adjusts itself to the road conditions, the driving situation and the drivers requirements.

Adjustable shock absorbers are required to make this possible. The steering assistance is also adjusted in addition to the damping.

Basics of the damping system

The shock absorbers have the task of quickly reducing the vibration energy of the body and road wheel oscillations.

Suspension configuration

The compression cycle and extension cycle are features of the suspension. The damping force in the compression cycle is normally lower than in the extension cycle.

The shock absorbers prevent the body rocking due to bumps in the road and stop the wheels bouncing out of control on the road surface. Furthermore the body is also stabilised by the damping forces during
dynamic manoeuvres.

An even greater damping effectiveness is achieved with adjustable shock absorbers since the current driving situation can be taken into consideration more efficiently. The electronically controlled damping control unit determines within milliseconds what level of damping is required at which wheel and adjusts the shock absorber accordingly.

The damping level is the rate at which the vibrations are reduced. This is dependent on the damping force of the shock absorber and the size of the sprung masses.

Reducing the sprung masses increases the damping level.

Adjustable shock absorber

An adjustable shock absorber using a twin-tube design is employed for the DCC adaptive chassis control. The piston runs in chamber 1 and there is an additional gas chamber in chamber 2.

Function in extension and compression cycle

Check valves on the piston and base plate cause the oil to flow in the directions shown in the diagram during extension and compression.

The oil is fed to the adjustment valve through the ring channel and it flows in the same direction (uniflow) during extension and compression. The oil flows back into chamber 2 from the adjustment valve.

The adjustment valve determines the pressure in chamber 2 and thus the damping.

The cylinder contains chamber 2.

It is only partly filled with oil. There is a gas cushion with a de-foaming spiral above the oil filling. Chamber 2 is used to compensate changes in the oil volume.

The oil flow is controlled by the damping valve units on the piston, on the chamber base and in the adjustment valve. They consist of a system of flat springs, coil springs and valve bodies with oil flow ports.

During the extension cycle, the oil flow is controlled by:

  • the adjustment valve,
  • the base valve and
  • to a limited extent the piston valve.

During the compression cycle, the oil flow is throttled by:

  • the adjustment valve,
  • the piston valve and
  • to a limited extent the base valve.

Map for Adjustable shock absorber

Compared with a conventional shock absorber with fixed map, the adjustable shock absorber has an adjustable characteristic curve within a map.

Conventional shock absorbers have a characteristic curve that helps define the driving properties of the vehicle.
Defining this characteristic curve is the result of the suspension configuration that is carried out for each vehicle. This depends, among other things on the weight distribution of the vehicle, the engine, the vehicle characteristics and the axle kinematics.

The damping characteristic curves of the adjustable shock absorber can be modified by varying the current supplied to the adjustment valve. This creates a map.

This adjustment is made in all driving modes (“Normal”, “Sport” and “Comfort”).

Depending on the current driving situation, the shock absorber rates are adjusted within the specified map even when a driving mode is selected.

In “Fail Safe” mode, the adjustment valves are not powered and the shock absorbers are thus operated with a defined characteristic curve.

System description

DCC adaptive chassis control system

The adjustable shock absorbers are regulated by a control unit that adjusts the damping according to a control algorithm developed by Volkswagen. Depending on the input signals, the whole map of the adjustable shock absorbers is used. This control algorithm can also be switched from “Normal” mode to “Sport” or “Comfort” mode using the button and thus adjusted to customer requirements.

The system can be adjusted when the vehicle is stationary or travelling.

The DCC adaptive chassis control is always active. It is an intelligent automatically controlled system that adjusts the vehicle shock absorbers depending on

  • the road surface,
  • the respective driving situation (e.g. braking, accelerating and cornering) and
  • the driver’s requirement.

Thus the driver always has the ideal suspension setting.

Notes:

  • The driving mode last activated is also still active after the ignition is switched OFF/ON.
  • The driving mode can be switched over while the vehicle is stationary or on the road.
  • The adjustment valves are not powered when the vehicle is stationary.

Selectable DCC modes

The DCC mode can be set by the driver depending on individual requirements using the button to the right of the gear lever. Press the button until you obtain the required setting. You can repeat this as often as required. The modes are always switched through in the order “Normal” — “Sport” — “Comfort”.

Normal mode

“Normal” mode is active when neither the “Comfort” nor “Sport” labels on the button are illuminated yellow.

This setting provides an overall balanced, but still dynamic driving feel.

It is well suited for everyday use.

Sport mode

This mode is active when the “Sport” label is illuminated yellow in the button.

This setting gives the vehicle sporty handling with a harder basic configuration. The steering is also set sporty and the chassis damping is stiffer.

This setting allows a particularly sporty driving style.

Comfort mode

This mode is active when the “Comfort” label is illuminated yellow in the button.

This setting leads to a comfort-oriented, softer basic configuration of the chassis damping.

It is suitable, for example, for driving on bad roads and for long journeys.

The differences in the modes are noticeable from the varying hardness of the basic damping settings. They are superimposed by higher damping force requirements due to the driving situations.

System Description

Overview of components used in vehicle

The diagram is a simplified depiction of the components in the DCC adaptive chassis control system and their relationships (the senders each have a separate connection to the electronically controlled damping control unit J250 — they are combined for each axle in the diagram for reasons of simplicity).

E387 Shock absorber damping adjustment button
G76 Rear left vehicle level sender
G78 Front left vehicle level sender
G289 Front right vehicle level sender
G341 Front left body acceleration sender
G342 Front right body acceleration sender
G343 Rear body acceleration sender
J104 ABS control unit
J250 Electronically controlled damping control unit
J285 Control unit in dash panel insert
J500 Power steering control unit
J533 Data bus diagnostic interface
N336 Front left shock absorber damping adjustment valve
N337 Front right shock absorber damping adjustment valve
N338 Rear left shock absorber damping adjustmentvalve
N339 Rear right shock absorber damping adjustment valve

System link to brakes and steering

In the DCC adaptive chassis control, information is exchanged between the electronically controlled damping control unit and the associated networked control units via the CAN data bus.
The system overview shows an example of the information that is provided via the CAN data bus or is received and used by the networked control units.

System description

System overview

Function

Shock absorber for DCC adaptive chassis control

Twin-tube shock absorbers are used for the DCC adaptive chassis control. An electrically controlled adjustment valve mounted on the outside of the shock absorber regulates the damping force.

By varying the current, the damping force of the active shock absorber setting can be adjusted within a few milliseconds by the adjustment valve.

The 3 vehicle level senders provide signals that are required to calculate the necessary shock absorber setting together with the signals from the 3 body acceleration senders. The maps for the respective shock absorber setting are stored in the electronically controlled damping control unit J250.

In the diagram, the ammeter is shown simply to help explain the current supplied to the adjustment valve (ammeter in “Normal” mode).

A fixed current is not used to control the system within the “Normal”, “Sport” and “Comfort” modes, instead a range of values are used (see yellow-coloured area in ammeter).

The following diagrams for the possible adjustment valve modes simply show the centre position of the ammeter needle within the yellow-coloured area.

Adjustment valve

The adjustment valve is mounted on the side of the shock absorber so that oil from the shock absorber ring channel flows to the valve. The oil supplied from the adjustment valve is sent to chamber 2 of the shock absorber.

The valve is adjusted by applying a current to the coil (0.24 A to max. 2.0 A) and the resulting changes inside the adjustment valve. Depending on the control position of the adjustment valve, the oil flowing from the shock absorber moves the main slider to a corresponding horizontal position so that a specific amount of oil can flow back to the shock absorber through the return channel. The main slider position is achieved by setting a differential pressure (compared with the pressure of the oil flowing from the shock absorber) in the inner control volume. The differential pressure is set by pre-tensioning the gap cross-section between the pressure head and control plate. If the pre-tension becomes greater, for example, the amount of oil flowing away centrally through the main slider and further through the ring gap and control channel is reduced, the pressure increases in the inner control volume and the main piston can only be moved slightly to the right. This changes the damping behaviour towards “hard”. If the pre-tension becomes smaller, the system behaves in the opposite way. The damping behaviour is changed towards “soft”

Function

Adjustment valve in “Normal” mode

In “Normal” mode, a current in a middle range between 0.24 A and 2.0 A is supplied to the coil. The armature is moved together with the push rod and pressure head and is pre-tensioned slightly.

The oil flowing from the shock absorber presses the main piston to a horizontal centre position so that a medium quantity of oil can leave again via the return channel and be fed back to the shock absorber.

This is achieved by setting a medium pre-tension between the pressure head and control plate.

The differential pressure is also set accordingly in the internal control volume and the position of the main piston is set in a horizontal middle position.

The damping behaviour is thus between “soft” and “hard”.

Adjustment valve in “hard”

In “hard”, the coil is powered in a range up to a max. of 2.0 A. The armature is pressed to the left together with the push rod and pressure head with maximum pre-tensioning to the left.

As a result, there are smaller gap cross-sections between the control plate and pressure head compared with “Normal” mode.

The differential pressure in the internal control volume increases and the main piston sets itself in its horizontal position so that a lower oil quantity flows back via the return channel to the shock absorber than in “Normal” mode.

This changes the damping behaviour towards “hard”.

This is a typical state of the adjustment valve for a considerably dynamic maneuver.

Adjustment valve in “soft”

In “soft”, the magnet is powered with 0.24 A, for example, and has less pre-tensioning together with the push rod and pressure head. The pressure head moves the control piston to the left by the same amount and releases the ring gap only in a slightly reduced cross-section. The oil flows via this gap and the subsequent control channel back to the shock absorber.

The gap cross-section between the control plate and pressure head increases with this slightly lower pre-tensioning of the pressure head. The differential pressure in the internal control volume drops. The main piston thus sets itself in its horizontal position so that a greater amount of oil flows back via the return channel than in “hard”.

This changes the damping behaviour towards “soft”.

This is a typical state of the adjustment valve for a considerably dynamic manoeuvre.

Adjustment valve in “Fail Safe”

If a shock absorber, at least two sensors or the electronically controlled damping control unit J250 fail, “Fail Safe” mode is set.

In “Fail Safe” mode, the shock absorbers are not powered and the vehicle behaves as if fitted with conventional shock absorbers. The armature moves together with the push rod and pressure head to the right until it rests against the valve housing. The control piston also moves and closes the direct access to the ring gap. The oil now opens the fail-safe valve and flows via the control channel to the shock absorber.

Electrics

Electronically controlled damping unit J250

The control unit J250 is in the boot on the right-hand side behind the panelling (Passat CC).
It evaluates the signals from the vehicle level senders G76, G78, G289 and the body acceleration sender G341, G342, G343 and constantly calculates the respective optimum current for the four shock absorbers taking the road, driving situation and driver requirement into consideration.
It adjusts the shock absorbers within milliseconds using a controlled current (approx. 0.24 A … 2.0 A).

Indications in dash panel insert

The suspension setting that the driver selects manually using the shock absorber damping adjustment button E387 is displayed in the dash panel insert.
The setting/display last selected is available when the vehicle is started.

Volkswagen level senders G76, G78, G289

The vehicle level senders are so-called turn angle sensors.

They are all fitted near to the shock absorbers and are connected to the traverse links via coupling rods.

The wheel spring travel is forwarded to the sensors from the movement of the traverse links on the front and rear axle and on the coupling rods and converted into an angle of rotation.

The turn angle sensor used works with static magnetic fields and uses the Hall principle.

The signal output supplies a PWM signal (pulse-width modulated signal) proportional to the angle for shock absorber control.

The three level sensors are identical; only the mountings, the coupling rods and kinematics to the sides and axles.

Electrics

Design

The sender is set up in a two-chamber system.

On one side (1st chamber), there is the rotor and, on the opposite side, (2nd chamber) the circuit board with stator.

The rotor and stator are each fitted so they are sealed.

The rotor consists of a non-magnetised stainless steel shaft in which a rare-earth magnet is glued. Rare-earth magnets are used where high magnetic field strengths in conjunction with the smallest possible dimensions are needed.

The rotor is connected to the coupling rod by the operating lever and is also driven by it.

The rotor is mounted in a radial shaft seal in the operating lever. This protects the construction from the elements.

The stator consists of a Hall sensor that is located on a circuit board.

The circuit board is moulded in a PU mass (PU = polyurethane) and is thus also protected against external influences.

Function

The magnetic flow is transferred and amplified using the Hall plates.

Unlike conventional Hall senders, these elements deliver special sine and cosine signals.

In the chip on the circuit board, the signals are converted so that the level changes of the body are recognisable for the electronically controlled damping control unit J250.

Electrics

Body acceleration senders G341, G342, G343

The body acceleration senders measure the vertical acceleration of the body.

The front left body acceleration sender G341 and front right body acceleration sender G342 are mounted on the body at the top next to the shock absorbers.

The rear body acceleration sender G343 is mounted at the top next to the left-hand rear shock absorber.

Design and function

The body acceleration senders work according to the capacitive measuring principle.

An elastic mass m oscillates between capacitor plates as a middle electrode that pulls the capacities of capacitors C1 and C2 opposite the rhythm of their oscillation.

The plate spacing d1 of one capacitor is increased by the amount that spacing d2 in the other capacitor is reduced.

This changes the capacities of the individual capacitors.

An electronic evaluation system delivers an analogue signal voltage to the electronically controlled damper control unit J250.
Sender measuring range
The measuring range of the sender is + or – 1.6g.
g = measurement for the acceleration
1g = 9.81 m/sec2

Electrics

Functional diagram

E387 Shock absorber damping adjustment button
G76 Rear left vehicle level sender
G78 Front left vehicle level sender
G289 Front right vehicle level sender
G341 Front left body acceleration sender
G342 Front right body acceleration sender
G343 Rear body acceleration sender
J104 ABS control unit
J250 Electronically controlled damping control unit
J285 Control unit in dash panel insert
J500 Power steering control unit
J519 Onboard supply control unit
J533 Data bus diagnostic interface
K189 Shock absorber damping adjustment warning lamp
L76 Button illumination bulb
N336 Front left shock absorber damping adjustment valve
N337 Front right shock absorber damping adjustment valve
N338 Rear left shock absorber damping adjustment valve
N339 Rear right shock absorber damping adjustment valve

Components of the Adaptive Chassis Control – DCC – and fitting locations

1 – Shock absorber damping adjustment button -E387-
Fitting location: in front of gear lever in centre console

The shock absorber damping adjustment button -E387- sets the system to three different modes:

  • Standard
  • Sport
  • Comfort

The operating sequence is -Normal- > -Sport- > -Comfort- > -Normal- > …
In the shock absorber damping adjustment button -E387-, the fields -Sport- and -Comfort- are back-lit with a yellow function LED when the selection of the corresponding mode is active.
When -Normal- mode is selected, the shock absorber damping adjustment button -E387- is not illuminated.

2 – Shock absorber with rear right shock absorber damper adjustment valve -N339-.
3 – Electronically controlled damping control unit -J250-
Fitting location: behind luggage compartment trim on right side
If the electronically controlled damping control unit -J250- is renewed, the basic setting of the adaptive chassis control DCC must be performed.
4 – Body acceleration sender, rear -G343-
Fitting location: on rear left shock absorber mount
5 – Shock absorber with rear left shock absorber damper adjustment valve -N338-.
6 – Rear left vehicle level sender -G76-
If the rear left vehicle level sender -G76- is removed and installed, the basic setting of the adaptive chassis control DCC must be performed ? 7 – Front left body acceleration sender -G341-
8 – Shock absorber with front left shock absorber damper adjustment valve -N336-
9 – Front left vehicle level sender -G78- and front right vehicle level sender -G289-
If the rear left vehicle level sender -G78- and front right vehicle level sender -G289- are removed and installed, the basic setting of the adaptive chassis control DCC must be performed
10 – Shock absorber with front right shock absorber damper adjustment valve -N337-
11 – Front right body acceleration sender -G342-

Volkswagen Oil Standards – lists of all approved oils – Skoda – Audi – Seat

Volkswagen introduced it’s own specifications for engine oil in the mid 1990’s and these cover Volkswagen, Skoda, Audi and Seat made cars.

There are two new VW standards for oils, 504.00 for petrol powered engines and 507.00 for diesel powered engines. Introduced in late 2005, whilst these are seperate standards every oil made to date has meet the requirements of both standards. Hence why VW refer to the standards as 504.00/507.00.

All VW petrol and diesel engines with the exception of the Touareg R5 and V10 diesels with pump nozzles can use these new oils. Most Volkswagen cars come with a factory fill (first fill) of Castrol SLX Professional Powerflow Longlife III which was joint engineered by Volkswagen and Castrol.

Volkswagen 501.01/505.00 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 502.00/505.00/505.01 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 502.00/505.00 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 505.01 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 503.00/506.00 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 503.00/506.01 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 503.01 Approved Oils

Volkswagen 504.00/507.00 Approved Oils

List of the most common VW standards

  • VW 500.00 – VW spec for multigrade engine oils for petrol engines with SAE 5W-X/10W-X viscosity for engines built up until August 1999 (MY 2000).
  • VW 500.00 + 505.00 – Oil meets both VW 500.00 and 505.00 spec.
  • VW 501.01 – VW spec for petrol engines for engines built up until August 1999 (MY 2000).
  • VW 501.14 – Brake fluid with low viscosity, VW 2006>.
  • VW 502.00 – VW spec, oil for petrol engines. Successor of VW 501.01 & 500.00 spec.
  • VW 503.00 – Long-life petrol engine oil for VW cars with WIV. Meets ACEA A1, SAE 0W-30 or 5W-30. Suitable for the AUDI S4, engines with an output greater than 180bhp should use 503.01 or 504.00/507.00.
  • VW 503.01 – Special engine oil for some VW petrol engines. SAE 5W-30. Suitable for the Ausi RS4, TT, S3 and A8 6.0 V12.
  • VW 504.00 – Long-life petrol engines with WIV.
  • VW 505.00 – Passanger car diesel engine oil, minimum performance level CCMC PD-2. Lists viscosities:- SAE 5W-50, 10W-50/60, 15W-40/50, 20W-40/50 requiring 13% max evaporation loss and SAE 5W-30/40, 10W-30/40 requiring 15% max evaporation loss.
  • VW 505.01 – Special engine oil for VW turbodiesel with pump-injector-unit and for the V8 commonrail turbodiesel engines. Meets ACEA B4 SAE 5W-40 spec.
  • VW 506.00 – Special long-life engine oil for turbodiesel engines with WIV, viscosity is SAE 0W-30.
  • VW 506.01 – Special long-life oil for turbodiesel engines with pump-injector-unit with WIV.
  • VW 507.00 – Long-life diesel engine oil with WIV.
  • VW 508.00 – Fuel economy low saps oil in development.

WIV is extended drain periods up to 30,000km or 24 months.

VW OIL Requirements (1998-2006)

Volkswagen DSG Statistics

VW sells one millionth DSG, next million on the way

1 million DSG – Volkswagen celebrates the bestselling gearbox
Kassel has produced the dual-clutch gearbox for the Group since 2003
Latest 7-speed DSG now available

Wolfsburg/Kassel, 05 February 2008 – DSG – three letters that stand for supreme shift comfort, economy and sportiness. Together with staff from the Kassel factory and Prof. Werner Neubauer, member of the Board of Management of the Volkswagen brand responsible for the Components division, the management of the Volkswagen factory in Kassel today celebrated the one-millionth dual-clutch gearbox (DSG).

The idea for the dual-clutch gearbox was born in motor-racing. It was picked up by Volkswagen in the 1980s and has since been developed further. When the first Volkswagen DSG went into series production in 2003, it sent shockwaves through professional circles. This innovation provided a previously unknown level of shift comfort. The once clear line between automatic and manual gearboxes had been bridged, and an extraordinary level of driving dynamics achieved.

Even the customers were soon enthusing, despite all the reservation compared to conventional gearboxes. Just five years later, the DSG has, for example, a 25 percent installation rate on the Touran. This is also a major success for the staff at the Kassel factory, the only Volkswagen factory to produce the DSG.

In 2007 alone, more than 400,000 six-speed DSG gearboxes were installed across the Group – and there is no sign of an end to this success story. “Because of the great demand, we shall shortly be boosting our daily capacity to 1,750 units,” explained General Factory Manager Dr. Hans-Helmut Becker.

Prof. Werner Neubauer added: “All around the world, our DSG gearboxes from Kassel are synonymous with sporty driving pleasure and economical fuel consumption. They successfully combine the best of two gearbox worlds. We are already on the way to the two-millionth DSG, and on the way, this modern technology will sharpen Volkswagen’s global competitive edge in the field of transmission technology even further.”

Jürgen Stumpf, Chairman of the Works Council at the VW factory in Kassel is also convinced by the DSG: “The competence and expertise of our staff make this cutting edge technology ‘made by Kassel’ possible. The DSG has now become a guarantee for job security at the factory.”

Volkswagen has now shifted up a gear with the new 7-speed dual-clutch gearbox, the second generation of the successful bestseller. This gearbox combines two world firsts. Firstly, it is the first 7-speed DSG for front-traverse installation. Secondly, it is the first with clutches that are not immersed in oil, but which run “dry”. This enables the latest Volkswagen DSG, available in the Golf, Golf Plus, Cross Golf, Golf Variant, Polo, Cross Polo and other models to achieve even greater efficiency.

New 7 Speed DSG

28th January, 2008

Five years ago Volkswagen presented the first production dual-clutch transmission in the world: the 6-speed DSG. An intelligent automatic, a transmission of superlatives. The winning move of dual clutch transmissions had begun at Volkswagen.

Since then over one million 6-speed DSGs have been sold! In just the first eleven months of last year 364,000 were sold. This is now being followed up by another transmission sensation: the world’s first 7-speed DSG to be produced in high-volume. For many car drivers this could signify the final turn away from conventional transmissions. Because the new DSG can do everything better than a manual gearbox. It is more fuel efficient, sporty and comfortable.

DSG for the “small” high-volume engines
The new 7-speed DSG makes the revolutionary transmission technology available for smaller engines too, engines that develop up to 250 Newton-meter torque. The 7-speed DSG will be initially introduced on the Golf, Golf Variant and Golf Plus paired with the latest TSI (90 kW / 122 PS) and the bestselling TDI (77 kW / 105 PS) of the model series.

New “dry” dual clutch improves efficiency
The most prominent component of the DSG is its dual clutch. In comparison to the 6-speed DSG, there is no “wet” clutch in the new transmission that is a clutch immersed in an oil bath rather a “dry” clutch. That too is a world first for DSG technology. This and other engineering modifications led to significant improvements to the DSG’s efficiency. The result: Further reduced fuel consumption and emissions values, even greater convenience and driving fun.

The 122 PS TSI in the Golf consumes just 5.9 liters/100 km with DSG. A record
A look at the fuel economy and driving performance data of the Golf, with and without 7-speed DSG, underscores the progress made. This much can be said right away: The new 122-PS TSI on the Golf is a masterpiece of fuel efficiency. Shifted by a manual 6-speed gearbox, the charged gasoline engine in the Golf consumes just 6.3 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers and this is even less than that of models with lower PS output. However, when the same Golf TSI is paired with the new 7-speed DSG, average fuel consumption (95 ROZ octane Super) is reduced even further: to just 5.9 liters. Similarly, CO2 emissions are reduced from 149 g/km to 139 g/km. These are data that just a short while ago would have been considered inconceivable for a gasoline engine in this performance class. Especially for an automatic: Compared to a conventional automatic with torque converter, the new DSG even consumes up to 20 percent less fuel!

DSG market share up to 28 percent. Trend is upward
Since the 7-speed DSG can now also serve on smaller engines, another jump in volume can be expected for DSG. In the final months of 2007, the DSG share in the Golf class even without 7-speed DSG already rose to above nine percent. The year’s average for the new Golf Variant came in at over ten percent. On the Golf Plus the average for 2007 was greater than twelve percent. The Jetta had a DSG share of over 13 percent, and the Eos over 14 percent. 24 percent of all Touran buyers chose a dual-clutch transmission in the past year. It was about 22 percent on the Passat sedan and over 28 on the Passat Variant. The trend toward automatics when they have DSG is therefore clearly evident.

Before production start the new DSG covered two million test kilometers
Both DSGs are built at the VW Transmission Plant in Kassel. The light 70 kilogram 7-speed DSG is built with about 400 parts. The new transmission is like an old friend to employees in Kassel as production volume is being ramped up these days: as early as September 2005 a die-casting machine was used to produce the first prototype case. While the many DSGs had to prove their qualities on stationary test benches for far more than 60,000 hours of durability testing, developers sent the other DSG prototypes aboard Golf and Co. to run test trial routes in the real world. They covered about two million kilometers. Afterwards the findings were clear: the new DSG is extremely durable and extremely efficient too.

Pilot production started in November 2007 in Kassel
In the last week of November 2007, series production of the new DSG was finally started. Plans already call for increasing output up to 750 7-speed DSGs per day over the course of this year. If demand rises even more, production could be ramped up to 1,500 7-speed DSGs per day by implementing a second assembly line. In parallel, 1,500 units of the 6-speed DSG are being produced daily in Kassel. Demand is booming!

Facts and Figures

  • 0.4 liters fuel per 100 kilometers fuel savings on Golf TSI (122 PS) plus 7-speed DSG compared to identically powered counterpart with 6-speed manual transmission
  • 1.7 liters of oil are at work in the 7-speed DSG
  • 6 models can currently be ordered with 7-speed DSG
  • 6.5 liters of oil are at work in the 6-speed DSG
  • 70 kilograms is the weight of the 7-speed DSG
  • 93 kilograms is the weight of the 6-speed DSG
  • 105 PS is the power output of the currently “smallest” Volkswagen engine with DSG
  • 140 degrees (maximum) hot oil surrounds the control module (mechatronics) on the 6-speed DSG
  • 226 employees work in DSG production
  • 250 Newton-meter is the maximum torque of engines that are paired with Volkswagen’s 7-speed DSG
  • 300 PS is the power output of the currently “largest” Volkswagen engine with DSG
  • 350 Newton-meter is the maximum torque of engines that are paired with Volkswagen’s 6-speed DSG
  • 750 7-speed DSGs are already being produced every day at transmission plant in Kassel
  • 1,500 6-speed DSGs leave the Kassel transmission plant daily
  • 2003: first 6-speed DSG is introduced (on the Golf R32)
  • 2004: 6-speed DSG is used in combination with a turbodiesel for the first time (on Golf TDI and Touran TDI with 105 PS and 140 PS, respectively)
  • 2004: new Golf GTI offers a TSI paired with DSG for the first time
  • 2005: first Bugatti Veyron 16.4 with DSG is delivered
  • 2007: new Golf TSI with 122 PS and 7-speed DSG already places 2nd in Environmental Automobile List of the Verkehrsclub Deutschland (VCD; “German Travel Club”) for the compact class
  • 2007: Golf GT Sport with 170 PS strong TSI plus 6-speed DSG wins Technological Innovation of the Year award in Barcelona
  • 2007: at the end of this year series production was started for the 7-speed DSG
  • 2008: new Golf TSI with 122 PS and 7-speed DSG earns “Yellow Angel 2008? award by ADAC in “Innovation and Environment” category
  • 150,000 6-speed DSGs this DSG production milestone was surpassed at the Kassel transmission plant in 2005
  • 400,000 is the number of Volkswagens sold worldwide with DSG in 2007
  • 1,000,000 6-speed DSGs this DSG production milestone was surpassed at the Kassel transmission plant in 2007
  • 2,000,000 is the number of test kilometers covered by the 7-speed DSG over the course of its development

Volkswagen DSG – 7 Speed Dual Clutch Gearbox (High Output)

dsg_trans_7_speed__550nm_17 Speed DSG Gearbox (High Output)

Maximum Torque: 550 Nm

Orientation: Longitudinal & Quattro

The new Audi S tronic
Seven gears for dynamics and efficiency

* News high-tech transmission with twin-clutch technology
* Shifts at lightning speed with high efficiency
* Suitable for longitudinal installation and quattro drive

Seven gears that shift at lightning speed without interrupting traction – Audi presents a new phase in the evolution of transmission systems. The seven-speed S tronic combines its dynamic working method with high efficiency. The new twin-clutch transmission is designed to work with longitudinally installed engines and the quattro all-wheel drive system, and its 550 Nm torque capacity makes it suitable for a wide range of sporty models. Audi will introduce the new S tronic into multiple model lines in series production during the course of this year.

dsg_trans_7_speed__550nm_2With the seven-speed S tronic, Audi is launching a new phase in its drive strategy. The new transmission, which was developed entirely by Audi, is intended for the mid-range model lines. Audi has designed it to be sporty while also being a highly efficient high-tech component.

Audi drivers can use the new seven-speed S tronic in various modes. The fully automatic mode, in which the computer selects the gear, keeps the D (Drive) and S (Sport) programs available. The gears can also be manually switched with the shift selector lever or with the optional rocker switch on the steering wheel – an amazingly fast process.

The new high-tech transmission from Audi gives the driver a dynamic and comfortable sense of shifting with unsurpassed precision and perfection. It combines outstanding economy with superb agility and potential for sporty driving.

The seven-speed S tronic is composed of two transmission structures. It integrates two multidisk clutches that control different gears. The large K1 clutch located on the outside conducts the torque via a solid shaft to the gear wheels for the odd gears 1, 3, 5 and 7. They are located in the rear of the cast-aluminum transmission housing, toward the center of the vehicle.

A hollow shaft rotates around the solid shaft. It is connected to the smaller K2 clutch, which is integrated into the inside of its larger sibling, and which controls the gear wheels for the even gears 2, 4 and 6, as well as reverse gear. All gear wheels are located in a single row on both drive shafts, in the order 4, 6, 2, R, 1, 3, 7 and 5.

dsg_trans_7_speed__550nm_3Both transmission structures are continuously active, but only one is powered at a time by the engine. For example, when the driver accelerates in third gear, the fourth gear is already engaged in the second transmission structure – lying in wait, so to speak. The switching process takes place as the clutch shifts – while K1 is opening, K2 closes at lightning speed. This process takes only a few hundredths of a second and is completed without interrupting traction. It is so comfortable and smooth that the driver hardly notices it.

The power flows from the drive shaft to the self-locking center differential of the quattro drivetrain, which distributes it into two directions. In the basic distribution, 60 percent of the torque flows over the cardan shaft to the differential for the rear axle, and 40 percent flows over a side shaft to the bevel gear of the front-axle differential. Because this shaft is installed at a 7.2 degree angle, it uses a slanted, beveloid gear. To reduce weight, it is also hollow.

The asymmetric-dynamic power distribution provides sporty and agile driving characteristics with slight emphasis on the rear end. When needed, the center differential can deliver up to 85 percent of the power to the rear axle or a maximum of 65 percent of the power to the front axle.

Typical Audi: uncompromising quality

Each component of the new seven-gear S tronic attests to Audi’s innovative way of thinking and to the company’s uncompromising quality standards. Carbon-coated synchronizer rings ensure synchronization of unsurpassed quality and stability. The gears one through three and reverse are also designed as three-cone synchronizations.

dsg_trans_7_speed__550nm_4Highly precise management of both multidisk clutches was one of the most important development goals. This was achieved in part with a compact pressure cylinder, electronically controlled rotation speed compensation and the use of an optimized coil spring package. This package of technology provides maximum precision and comfort at startup and shifting.

The transmission is managed by the so-called mechatronic module. This module involves a compact group of control units and hydraulic control valves that is integrated on the left of the transmission when facing the direction of travel. Its control concept allows the speed of the gear shifting process to vary and extremely precise control of the power necessary for the process.

The required control pressure is provided by an efficiently operating oil pump that is located next to the mechatronic module and is driven by a gear section. The oil pump is supported by a vacuum booster for cooling the twin clutch during starting. This allows the amount of oil pumped to be roughly doubled as needed without increasing power.

A unique feature of the seven-speed S tronic is its two separate oil systems. While the twin clutch, mechatronic module and oil pump are supplied by their own oil circuit with seven liters of automatic transmission fluid (ATF) oil, the wheelsets and the central and front-axle differential are lubricated with about 4.5 liters of hypoid gear oil. This separation allowed the development engineers to position all of the components ideally, without being forced to compromise by using a single lubricant.

Audi has designed the new seven-gear S tronic to provide both exhilarating driving and consistent economy. The new high-tech engine is notable for its very high efficiency. Its highly intelligent controls also allow economical driving in automatic mode. The maximum possible transmission-ratio spread of 8.0:1 allows a sporty, short transmission ratio for the first gear as well as an rpm-sinking, long ratio for the last gear. The seven-speed S tronic is designed for up to 9,000 rpm and can transmit torque of up to 55 Nm.

Vorsprung durch Technik: the history of S tronic

Audi has led the march in the field of transmissions for many years. The introduction of quattro all-wheel drive in 1980 was a milestone in the history of automotive technology. And the S tronic is a prime example of the company’s basic philosophy – “Vorsprung durch Technik.”

dsg_trans_7_speed__550nm_5The first Audi with a twin-clutch transmission was produced way back in November 1985 – the Sport quattro S1, which was driven by Walter Röhrl and his copilot Christian Geistdörfer in the World Rally Championships. Röhrl, the finest rally pilot of his time, described his 350 kW (476 hp) sports car as “a formidable thing” and a “natural phenomenon” – and the high-tech transmission provided him with even more powerful performance.

The twin-clutch transmission, which was controlled electrically with a short touch control lever in the S1, could shift through its five gears at lightning speed. Because the traction was not interrupted, the turbocharger for the five-cylinder engine remained constantly pressurized – a bypass in the engine’s airways supported this effect. A twin-clutch transmission was also on board the S1 during training for Röhrl’s victorious storming of the peaks during the 1987 Pikes Peak mountain race in Colorado.

The S tronic is one of the most versatile solutions in Audi’s range of transmissions. In the spring of 2003, Audi introduced the technology in series production in the TT Coupe and Roadster, combined with the high-torque 3.2-liter V6 with 184 kW (250 hp). The ultra-compact twin-clutch transmission, designed for transverse installation with six gears, was the perfect complement to the powerful engine. TT pilots could use it in automatic mode or shift the gears by hand, either with the short shift selector lever or with rocker switches affixed behind the steering wheel.

In the past five years, the new technology in the TT and A3 has become firmly established – as dynamic high-tech alternatives to hand-shifting as well as being fully imbued with the positive attributes of a conventional geared automatic transmission. Due to its wide range of strengths, the S tronic is also available in the A3 with a TDI four-cylinder engine. By the end of 2007, Audi had produced 188,338 cars in both model lines with twin-clutch transmissions.

A wide-ranging program: the ideal solution for every need

Today, Audi has a wide-ranging portfolio of transmission technology options – five technologies with widely varying characteristics may now be selected to perfectly fulfill their specific range of applications. Aside from the sporty S tronic with six – and now seven – gears, Audi offers a classic manual transmission, an automatic R tronic, the comfortable tiptronic torque-converter transmission, and the versatile, continuously variable multitronic – at least two customized solutions are available for each model range. The common denominators among all of these transmissions are compact and light construction, high efficiency, precise functioning in extremely durable quality, and convenient and simple operation.

Manual shift transmissions are available in many of the model ranges, from the compact A3 to the A6, along with the TT, the Q7 and the R8; they are suitable for combination with front-wheel and quattro drives. In the A4 and A5 model lines, Audi has introduced a new generation of transmissions that are notable due to modified positioning of the differential and for their greatly reduced internal friction, which further improves efficiency. Most manual transmissions operate with six gears. In the A3 1.9 TDI e and A3 Sportback 1.9 TDI e, five-gear transmissions are used in which the upper gears feature a somewhat longer gear ratio – which helps sink consumption on average to an exemplary 4.5 liters of diesel per 100 km (52.27 mpg).

The sequential-shift R tronic with six gears is reserved exclusively for the R8; as befits the character of a supercar, the engineers have designed it to be especially dynamic. In the R tronic, hydraulic units manage activation of the gears and clutch, and the driver’s commands are transmitted electronically.

The tiptronic transmissions from Audi are found in all sedan model lines, from the A3 to the A8, as well as in the high-performance Q7 SUV, in combination with front-wheel or quattro drive. The great strength of this classic torque-converter transmission is in its highly convenient shifting. In order to improve this even further while also improving efficiency, in the latest configuration, engineers have modified the damping system in the torque converter. In addition, gear shifting is completed more swiftly.

The redesigned multitronic also features even greater efficiency and dynamics. The continuously variable transmission from Audi combines the advantages of manual gear shifting with the strengths of an automatic. As an especially comfortable driveline, the multitronic available in the A4, A5, A6 and A8 is paired with front-wheel drive. The new seven-gear S tronic developed by Audi, which will be introduced in series production in multiple models during the course of this year, is combined with quattro technology – Audi has designed it as a sporty and highly efficient high-tech transmission.

Volkswagen DSG – 7 Speed Mechatronic Control Unit

 

dsg_trans_mechatronics_7_speed_1Open communication

The mechatronic components represent the ‘brain’ of the 7 gear dual-clutch gearbox DSG. They can implement complex shift operations in a fraction of a second. They consist of a control device and control valve assembly together with individual sensors and actuators. If a shift is to be performed, the control device communicates the gearbox data to the vehicle electronics network. Conversely, information is transmitted via this interface from the vehicle and motor to the gearbox computer.

Closed system

The mechatronics module is an autonomous unit with its own oil circulation system. The advantages are obvious: 

  • The viscosity of the hydraulic fluid can be adjusted specifically to suit these operating conditions.
  • The high degree of purity of the hydraulic oil permits the use of so-called cartridge valves with extremely small clearances. The result: significantly lower leakage rates and therefore efficient operation of an electrically driven pump.
  • The mechatronic components can be installed independently of the gearbox and they can be exhaustively tested in advance.
  • The system is ‘hybrid-friendly’, because the dual-clutch can be engaged and the gears can be changed even when the internal combustion motor is not running.

dsg_trans_mechatronics_7_speed_2